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March 15, 2013

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yakov

: skepticfrum
thats a beautiful thing you wrote is it your own?

Account Deleted

I tried to become an ideal religious man… I killed my own personality, and tried so hard to become one… anytime, anywhere.


Account Deleted

"
In others’ eyes, I am part of the world. But when I look out at the world from my own vantage point, I am not in it. What I see is the world. As an observer, I am the point of view that creates the world. I can’t belong to the world. In principle, we can say that it’s the truth."

"Remember. You can feel it if you hold your hand against your chest. It belongs to no one. It’s our pulse, yours and mine. This is what brings us to the truth. It’s what proves that we are the very world itself. Follow your instincts. The answer is already there."


Account Deleted

Which reminds me of..."It is complete. I have created a god. But I have no control over it."


Dave

Abu, thanks. I am glad we agree.

yakov

His [ the author ] is representational of a modern debased Jewish vision poisoned by lies and historical inaccuracies , worshiping shallowness and to be throw away when recognized as the trash it is

Abu Jihad Schneerson

Dave,I agree 101% with you!

Dave

Even the Orot Sefardic siddur has what I would consider idolatrous passages. Even the Conservative siddur has "Anim Zemirot" printed in it. Even Mishkan Tefillah, the Reform siddur has some anthropomorphic passages. All these must be rooted out.

Dave

Jeff,
I've come to the conclusion that all of traditional/ Orthodox Judaism has been infected to a greater or lesser degree with mysticism. Some groups eg. Modern Orthodox try to be less mystical. However, even my MO synagogue ends with the hymn "Anim Zemirot" which in my opinion is riddled with idolatry (Hashem wears tefillin? give me a break!)

Jeff

>In the final analysis, however, while answering
>some questions, the result is a theology that
>suggests a duality within the Divine Essence itself.

BTW, did anyone else pick up on this?

Would one aspect of that "duality" have the initials "MMS"?

Jeff

>By the time I was 20, I had learned by heart what many consider to be the deepest
>and most profound teachings of the Chabad Hasidic school of Jewish mysticism.

Yeah, well, it's Chabad. I've seen how their educational system works. I don't think the bar is set very high.

>Mine is a religion which is realistic, offering us things to believe in when we
>don’t have clear facts to rely on. My religion does not make claims it cannot
>substantiate.

Good Lord. How often do I say it? They have NO sense of irony.

Refugee from Boro Park

"I would awaken before dawn to study Hasidic texts. By the time I was 20, I had learned by heart what many consider to be the deepest and most profound teachings of the Chabad Hasidic school of Jewish mysticism."

I waited to read the whole article before deciding how self-serving this article sounds.

A basic point of logic: how do you know WHAT it is that God wants you to do if you don't know what God is? How do you know the halachos are from Hashem or are what he wants? Instead of being teachers of our tradition, rabbis have appointed themselves as God's representatives on earth. And obviously they are able to make a binding psak din. I'm glad this rabbi has at least pointed out the obvious that the rabbinic establishment ignores: that their foundations are shaky to begin with. Therefore, halacha should be optional. The point of this article seems to be: Rabbis don't know what God is, but we know what he wants, so do what we say. Also, we have authority over you because we're amazingly learned, you am ho'oretz.

I'm not saying I don't find Torah and Judaism (or rather parts of them) very inspiring on a spiritual level, but each individual has the right to choose what they believe in based on common sense and common decency. They should certainly have the right to ignore unbelievably detailed proscriptions of how to live each minute of one's life. That's the best way to go when you have no idea what God is and when God could be anything.

Abu Jihad Schneerson

This is the major weakness of Judaism.Too much focus on ritualism and almost no spirituality and theology.

R.W.

"My religion does not make claims it cannot substantiate."

Then you must be talking about a different religion from the one being peddled by countless Kiruv clowns the world over.

The difference is that they, unlike you, at least have the cojones to accept that Judaism does indeed make a whole host of claims, though proving them is ,of course, a whole 'nother story.

Sarek

With his way, you don't have to explain all the inconsistencies in the Torah.
Or to explain how and why God answers prayers if He already knows ahead of time how things will unfold.

ah-pee-chorus

what utter nonsense!!

before one can delve into questions such as "how the multiplicity that exists stems from the Oneness of our Creator, or how we can have free choice if God is omniscient, or how evil can exist if God is good, etc. " - or abdicate onesself from the need to do so, one needs to first accept that there is indeed a god and that he wrote a book called the torah.
insofar as the questions above are concerned, the answers are important and necessary in order to evaluate the likelihood of the existence of god, and whether answers exist which are reasonable while consistent with an omnibenevolent, omniscient and intercessory god. the authors calling the lack of clear answers to these issues "part of the beauty of Biblical and Talmudic Judaism" is laughable.

""Mine is a religion which is realistic, offering us things to believe in when we don’t have clear facts to rely on. My religion does not make claims it cannot substantiate.""

here he makes use of incredible spin and blatant distortion of facts. he paints it as a positive that judaism offers things to believe in without reliable facts. why is this good? is it good to believe in krishna, allah , thor or the flying spaghetti monster without evidence? this is a terrible idea which should be rejected, not something to applaud.
furthermore, judaism and the torah make numerous claims which not only cant be substantiated, but for which the contra-evidence is plentiful and impressive.
his shpiel might work on teens and ignorant BT's but to anyone with a bit of knowledge and the ability to think critically its just more deceptive kiruv category propoganda.

Yochanan Lavie

Do not presume the ways of God to scan/ The proper study of Mankind is Man.

Alexander Pope, from Essay on Man

jancsibacsi

This article sounds like particle physics to me,the deeper you go the less you understand:)

gopjew

>> Mine is a religion which is realistic


yep thats why kosher meats costs too much. lol

yudelman nachman

while at univarsity during the 1980's and already in my 40's i arrived at the conclusion that there were things beyond our understanding. that the profound questions had a simple answer, VIZ the answer is we have no answer.I am so grateful to this writer as i enter old age aware that i shall never realize the profound.But content with this fact.

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